Wireless Wide Area Networks (WWANs) - It is all about bandwidth, reliability, security and ROI. We design wireless networks for an availability of 99.999%, or higher. Our availability criteria is at least as stringent as that used by wireline voice carriers.

Prime Performance Technologies, Inc. (PPT) designs and installs wireless links that are faster, cheaper, and more secure and reliable than what a wireline carrier can deliver. And we complete the installation, configuration, testing and turn-over weeks (and in some cases months) before the carrier’s promised in-service date.

WWAN topologies can take several forms – Point-to-Point (PTP), Point-to-Multipoint (PMP), Mesh and Private WiMax. Customer’s requirements determine which topology is appropriate.

PPT has partnered with multiple, world-class manufacturers of wireless equipment and is able to design and support WWANs incorporating any and all topologies. Our partners include -

Airaya 2.4 and 5 GHz Unlicensed Bands + 4.9 GHz Licensed Public Safety Band
AvaLAN 900 MHz, 2.4 and 5 Unlicensed Bands
BelAir 2.4 and 5 GHz Unlicensed Bands + 4.9 GHz Licensed Public Safety Band
BridgeWave 80 GHz Licensed and 60 GHz Unlicensed Bands
Ceragon 6, 11, 18 and 23 GHz Licensed Bands
Dragonwave 2.5 GHz Unlicensed Band and 6, 11, 18 and 23 GHz Licensed Bands
Exalt 2.4, 5 and 24 GHz Unlicensed Bands and 4.9, 6, 11, 18 and 23 GHz Licensed Bands
Motorola 2.4 and 5 GHz Unlicensed Bands and 4.9, 6, 11, 18 and 23 GHz Licensed Bands
Nera 6, 11, 18 and 23 GHz Licensed Bands
Proxim 900 MHz, 2.4 and 5 GHz Unlicensed Bands + 4.9 GHz Licensed Public Safety Band

Several of the above manufacturers have products that operate in the WiMax, military, NATO and other special purpose bands. These and products that operate in the 30-40 GHz bands have been omitted from the table.

The physics of radio signals defines how far a signal can travel and how much data it can carry. As a "rule of thumb", the higher the frequency the greater the amount of data payload that can carry; the lower the frequency the lower the amount of data bandwidth. Also, the lower the frequency the greater the range and penetration of the radio signal. A 900 MHz unlicensed-band radio signal will travel farther and better penetrate some obstructions than a 23 GHz signal.

National and international organizations such as the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) have rules that allocate frequency bands for various uses and define the size of the channels within the frequency bands that can be used. These rules, along with a customer's bandwidth requirements, link distances, obstructions and local terrain and weather patterns have to be be taken into consideration when designing links that meet or exceed PPT's design criteria of 99.999% availability.